6 Reasons You Have Homebuyer's Remorse (And What To Do) - Home & Texture
Homeownership Homebuyers’ Remorse

6 Reasons You Might Have Buyer's Remorse After Moving

Buyer's remorse happens more often than you might think. Here's what you can do about it.

By
May 10, 2024 at 7:45 AM PST
Updated on May 9, 2024 at 11:52 PM PST
Homeownership Homebuyers’ Remorse

6 Reasons You Might Have Buyer's Remorse After Moving

Buyer's remorse happens more often than you might think. Here's what you can do about it.

By
May 10, 2024 at 7:45 AM PST
Updated on May 9, 2024 at 11:52 PM PST

Moving into a new home is like moving on to a new life chapter. For the most part, it comes with feelings of excitement. But sometimes, it can make you feel worse. If you feel like something’s not right after the boxes are unpacked and the furniture is set up, you’re not alone. In fact, experiencing buyer’s remorse happens more often than you might think, and there are a bunch of reasons why your new place isn’t giving you those warm, fuzzy feelings just yet.

Understanding why your new home isn’t quite hitting the mark is the key to finally enjoying it. So if you want to make the most of your new living space, here are six reasons why it isn’t cutting it…yet.

A nice neighborhood
Photo credit: Nikola Knezevic

You don’t like the neighborhood.

A lot of times, the problem isn’t necessarily the house but where it’s located. Sometimes the neighborhood isn’t as quiet as you imagined, or maybe it’s too far from friends, family, or work, making you feel isolated.

To fix this problem, try to connect with your new neighborhood by introducing yourself to neighbors, participating in community events, or exploring local hotspots to help you warm up to the area.

It doesn’t feel like “yours.”

One of the most common reasons for buyer’s remorse among first-time homeowners is that their new place doesn’t feel like home to them.

Even if you’ve moved all your stuff in, it can still remind you of the previous owners. Maybe the walls are painted a color you don’t care for, or the layout isn’t what you’re used to. Whatever it is that you aren’t vibing with, try giving it some time. Personalizing a space doesn’t happen overnight.

In the meantime, start with painting the walls, hanging your favorite art, or bringing in plants or decor items that make your space feel more like your own.

You’re comparing your new home to the previous one.

If you tend to compare your new home to your old home, you might be setting yourself up for disappointment. Of course, it’s okay to miss your old home. But as the old saying goes, “Comparison is the thief of joy,” and doing so can really dampen how you view your new place.

So to avoid buyer’s remorse, try to focus on the reasons you moved in the first place. Is your new home in a better location? Or maybe it comes with a beautiful yard or a great view? Every home has its strengths and weaknesses, so try to focus on the positive to better appreciate your new space.

Photo credit: Ivan Pantic

Your finances are taking a hit.

Moving can be very expensive, from the cost of the move itself or from unforeseen expenses popping up unexpectedly. When your new home is the source of your money problems, it can make it really hard to settle in and enjoy it.

Instead of seeing the glass half empty, try setting a budget for home improvements or unexpected costs so you can better plan and manage your finances.

Unexpected problems are popping up.

Finding out your home will need more renovation than you anticipated can be frustrating. Sometimes, upon moving in, you’ll notice that the floors squeak louder than expected, or that there’s less natural light than you thought when you toured the place.

In many cases, these issues don’t become noticeable until you’ve lived in your home for a while. And while they can be annoying to deal with, it’s really important that you do.

As you begin to notice these issues, be sure to address them head-on. Small fixes like adding more lighting, new curtains, or a few strategically placed rugs can make a world of difference in how you connect to your space.

The space isn’t functional yet.

If you downsized to a smaller home, it can be a real struggle to adapt to having less space. It can cause your home to feel too cramped, making your daily routines harder to manage.

If this is you, look into incorporating creative storage solutions and multi-functional furniture to make do with what you have. Most of the time, simply decluttering and reorganizing can provide a new perspective on the space.



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