5 Things We Learned From This Year's National Fair Housing Month Fair Housing - Home & Texture
Article Homeownership Fair Housing

5 Things We Learned From This Year's National Fair Housing Month

By
April 20, 2023 at 6:07 PM PST
Article Homeownership Fair Housing

5 Things We Learned From This Year's National Fair Housing Month

By
April 20, 2023 at 6:07 PM PST

April is National Fair Housing Month, whose mission is to end housing discrimination across the country. This year commemorates the 55th anniversary of the passing of the Fair Housing Act, which made it unlawful to discriminate in housing transactions.

Zillow, the real estate company and super housing app has done extensive research on how housing discrimination and other inequalities impact Black aspiring homeowners and other marginalized groups. In honor of National Fair Housing Month, we’ve recapped what we’ve learned below.

How Housing Discrimination Impacts Black People

Numerous data have established that Black people experience housing discrimination, whether they are renters or interested in buying a home. From being denied loans, to applications, Black people continue to face an uphill battle to own a home in America.

Several hurdles impact Black aspiring homeowners including generational redlining, racial policy practices, and of course the wealth gap. Zillow’s research team did manage to find a glimmer of hope despite all the setbacks Black families continue to endure on their path to homeownership.

5 Things We Learned From Fair Housing Month

Some of the things that were highlighted are not surprising, but a few were. Here are five things we learned from Fair Housing Month.

couple painting room
Getty Images
  • During the pandemic, Black homes across the country appreciated, according to Zillow.
  • Black and POC rental applicants pay more in security deposits and application fees than their white counterparts
  • Areas with more white homeowners tend to have more amenities than Black neighborhoods such as banks, gyms, and health services
  • Homeowners who live in neighborhoods that were previously “redlined” decades ago homes are still valued less than their neighboring homes.
  • The gap between Black and white homeownership shrunk during the pandemic

The wealth and housing gap between Black households and white households remain alarming, but there have been some subtle changes. Black households saw an increase in ownership in rural areas, but moving into suburban areas still seems to be a challenge.

To learn more about the discrepancies as well as other data to recap the rest of Fair Housing Month, check out Zillow for extensive data and analysis.

 

 




FOLLOW ALONG ON INSTAGRAM

#homeandtexture

Find us on social for more home inspiration where culture, personal style, and sophisticated shopping intersect to help you create a home where you love to live.